There is never a shortage of reptiles at the Chattahoochee Nature Center. From snakes to box turtles, there is so much to see and learn about these creatures. Did you know several native, non-venomous snakes are on exhibit at CNC? Learn how the corn snake got its name and why we have Florida pine snakes in Georgia. Also, learn all about the many hard-shelled creatures like the eastern box turtle, the only land turtle in the northern half of Georgia. They can live more than 75 years and only travel 5 miles their whole life! 

What makes a Reptile Unique

>> They are ectothermic (cold-blooded, rely on their environment to maintain body temperature)
>>  They shed their dry, scaly skin as they grow
>>  Some lay eggs and others give live birth
>>  The babies often look like miniature adult versions

 

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Can you believe it costs CNC close to $38,000 a year to feed and care for all of our animals?

Donate now to help us take care of them!

meet some of our reptiles

Only land turtle in northern half of Georgia. Lives over 75 years and only travels within a 5 mile radius throughout its life. See them In the Watershed Gallery. Female: Arrived in 2010 after requiring a leg amputation. Female: Arrived in 2010 after requiring a leg amputation. Annual food cost: $150

EASTERN BOX TURTLE: Terrapene carolina

Only land turtle in northern half of Georgia. Lives over 75 years and only travels within a 5 mile radius throughout its life.
See them In the Watershed Gallery.
Female: Arrived in 2010 after requiring a leg amputation. Female: Arrived in 2010 after requiring a leg amputation. Annual food cost: $150
Named slider because they often drop into the water when startled. Males have elongated front toenails used in courtship.  See him In the Watershed Gallery  Male: Arrived in 2006 after being kept as a pet in poor conditions. Annual food cost: $100

YELLOW-BELLIED SLIDER: Trachemys scripta

Named slider because they often drop into the water when startled. Males have elongated front toenails used in courtship.
See him In the Watershed Gallery
Male: Arrived in 2006 after being kept as a pet in poor conditions. Annual food cost: $100
Adult females are herbivores and adult males are omnivores. Females grow much larger than males.See him In the Watershed Gallery.   Male: Arrived in 2009 with numerous issues after being found in sewage. Annual food cost: $100

EASTERN RIVER COOTER: Pseudemys concinna

Adult females are herbivores and adult males are omnivores. Females grow much larger than males.
See him In the Watershed Gallery.
Male: Arrived in 2009 with numerous issues after being found in sewage. Annual food cost: $100
Can change color from green to gray, but is not related to chameleons Males have a pink throat fan (dewlap) that is used to attract mates and establish dominanceSee them In the Watershed Gallery. Males and Females: Arrived 2009-2015 after being rescued from development sites or taken out of pet trade Annual food cost: $175

GREEN ANOLE:
Anolis carolinensis

Can change color from green to gray, but is not related to chameleons Males have a pink throat fan (dewlap) that is used to attract mates and establish dominance
See them In the Watershed Gallery.
Males and Females: Arrived 2009-2015 after being rescued from development sites or taken out of pet trade
Annual food cost: $175
Native to SW portion of Georgia. Can reach 200 pounds.  See it In the Watershed Gallery. Undetermined Gender: Arrived in 2017 after being hatched in captivity ~2009. Annual food cost: $150

ALLIGATOR SNAPPING TURTLE: Macrochelys temminckiina

Native to SW portion of Georgia. Can reach 200 pounds.
See it In the Watershed Gallery. Undetermined Gender: Arrived in 2017 after being hatched in captivity ~2009. Annual food cost: $150
Lives in dry, sandy soils. Inflates front of body and hisses loudly as a bluff to predators.See her In the Watershed Gallery. Female: Arrived in 2001 after being kept illegally for commercial sale. Annual food cost: $65

FLORIDA PINE SNAKE: Pituophis melanoleucus

Lives in dry, sandy soils. Inflates front of body and hisses loudly as a bluff to predators.
See her In the Watershed Gallery.
Female: Arrived in 2001 after being kept illegally for commercial sale. Annual food cost: $65
Yellow rat snakes are found in the coastal plains of Georgia. See her In the Watershed Gallery. Female: Arrived in 2012 from a Florida breeder who was retiring. Annual food cost: $65

EASTERN (YELLOW) RAT SNAKE: Pantherophis alleghaniensis Arboreal

Yellow rat snakes are found in the coastal plains of Georgia.
See her In the Watershed Gallery.
Female: Arrived in 2012 from a Florida breeder who was retiring. Annual food cost: $65
Also called the red rat snake. Identifying characteristics include a checkerboard belly. See it In the Watershed Gallery. Male: Arrived in 2008 after hatching at a North Carolina nature center in 1995. Annual food cost: $65

CORN SNAKE: Pantherophis guttatus

Also called the red rat snake. Identifying characteristics include a checkerboard belly.
See it In the Watershed Gallery.
Male: Arrived in 2008 after hatching at a North Carolina nature center in 1995. Annual food cost: $65
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